Past Student Fellows

Former EDR Program Student Fellows

Student Fellow for Summer 2019

  • Zoë McAlear is a current master’s student in the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, with a concentration in Environmental Policy and Planning. She is spending the summer of 2019 as a fellow with the EDR Program. Zoë has a strong interest in how to better plan for and manage the nature and natural resources in and around our cities, particularly through inclusive, community-based processes and collaborative efforts. Her primary current research interests include collaborative natural resource management and urban climate change adaptation.

Student Fellows for the 2018-2019 academic year

  • Leanne Bernstein (Master of City and Metropolitan Planning, 2019) has research interests in sustainability and using policy and development as mechanisms for creating resilient cities. She is supporting a variety of EDR Program activities and is excited to explore how collaboration and planning can promote smart and just growth.
  • Mikala Jordan (Master of City and Metropolitan Planning, 2020) has research and career interests in the use of collaborative planning to shape more resilient, livable, and sustainable communities. She is especially intrigued by planning processes in gateway and natural amenity communities; therefore, she is very excited to learn from and support the EDR program.

Student Fellows for the 2017-2018 academic year

  • Leanne Bernstein (Master of City and Metropolitan Planning, 2019) has research interests in sustainability and using policy and development as mechanisms for creating resilient cities. She is supporting a variety of EDR Program activities and is excited to explore how collaboration and planning can promote smart and just growth.
  • Cody Lutz (Master of City and Metropolitan Planning, 2018) has research interests in sustainability and environmental planning, as well as public lands, natural resource management, and gateway communities. His work with the EDR program included regional collaborative planning efforts and public engagement planning
  • Madeline Sandt (JD Candidate, 2019) plans to specialize in environmental law with her main interests being in land use and natural resource law. Her work with the EDR Program focused on supporting the United States Forest Service’s internal and external collaboration efforts.

Student Fellows for the 2016-2017 academic year

  • Dylan Corbin (Master of City and Metropolitan Planning, 2017) worked with the EDR Program to conduct a stakeholder assessment for the Western Zion Corridor Project (now the Zion Regional Collaborative) and conducted research about gateway communities.
  • Katherine Daly (Master of City and Metropolitan Planning, 2017) helped conduct situation assessments for Project 7B (now the Bonner Regional Team) and the Rockville Bridge Community Learning Forum, supported the inaugural Short Course on Effective Natural Resources Collaboration, and provided research and facilitation support for the Western Zion Corridor Project (now the Zion Regional Collaborative).
  • Richard Decker (Master of City and Metropolitan Planning, 2016) conducted background research and context analysis to support the Western Zion Corridor Project (now the Zion Regional Collaborative).
  • Kim Kernan (LLM, 2017) co-facilitated, took meeting notes, and drafted meeting summaries for the Escalante River Watershed Partnership.  She also took over facilitation responsibilities for the Utah Riparian Forest Restoration Initiative in May 2017.  Kim received a fellowship from the Global Change and Sustainability Center (GSCS).
  • Kailey Kornhauser (Master of Environmental Humanities, 2017) assisted with 57 Degrees North, supported the inaugural Short Course on Effective Natural Resources Collaboration, and provided research and facilitation support for the Western Zion Corridor Project (now the Zion Regional Collaborative).
  • Nils Lofgren (JD, 2018) received EDR Fellow tuition benefits in Spring 2017 for legal research on the 2012 Forest Planning Rule, which mandated increased collaboration in all forest plan revisions.  He also gathered resource materials on effective facilitation techniques and exercises for use in a facilitation training workshop. Nils is pursuing a joint JD/Masters in Real Estate Development degree.
  • Megan Mustoe (JD, 2017) received directed research credit for legal research on collaborative planning opportunities for local government under federal land management statutes.  She facilitated the Utah Riparian Forest Restoration Initiative, and assisted with the Utah Program on Collaboration. She received a Certificate in Environmental and Natural Resources Law, and was awarded a David C. Williams fellowship for the 2016-2017 academic year.
  • James Owen (JD, 2017) received environmental clinic credit in Fall 2016 and EDR Fellow tuition benefits in Spring 2017 for his work on a Rocky Mountain Mineral Law Foundation (RMMLF) special project grant. He developed a series of five inter-related simulation exercises based on an oil and gas development fact scenario, designed to help participants practice negotiation and collaborative problem-solving skills. The exercises included two-person, three-person and four-person negotiations, a NEPA collaborative, and facilitation of a public meeting. James also presented about the simulation series at the annual Natural Resources Law Teachers Institute in Banff in June 2017.

Student Fellows for the 2015-2016 academic year

  • Dylan Corbin (Master of City and Metropolitan Planning, 2017) worked with the EDR Program to conduct a stakeholder assessment for the Western Zion Corridor Project.
  • Richard Decker (Master of City and Metropolitan Planning, 2016) conducted background research and context analysis to support the Western Zion Corridor Project.
  • Kailey Kornhauser (Master of Environmental Humanities, 2017) conducted an independent study with EDR Program in Spring 2016, focusing on collaborative problem solving and resilience in the public sector. She also conducted research on approaches for assessing the effect of collaborative processes on individuals and communities.
  • Megan Mustoe (JD Candidate, 2017) conducted legal research on various issues in Fall 2015 and will be taking notes, drafting meeting summaries, and acting as co-facilitator in select La Sal Sustainability Collaboration monthly meetings during Spring 2016. She also assisted with the Utah Program on Collaboration. She plans to receive a Certificate in Environmental and Natural Resources Law.
  • Ashley Scarff (Master of City and Metropolitan Planning, 2015) conducted research during Fall 2015 on how comprehensive planning can be used to support local government collaboration with federal public land management agencies.
  • Natalie Watkins (Master of City and Metropolitan Planning, 2017) conducted a literature review of the state of research and teaching about negotiation, dispute resolution, consensus building and leadership in relationship to planning; this research will be used to write an academic journal article calling for greater integration of collaborative problem-solving theory and practice into planning pedagogy. She also assisted the EDR Program with various support tasks, such as graphic design for outreach materials and updating email lists.

Student Fellows, Summer 2015

  • Hannah Payne (Master of City Planning, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2016). Her concentration was in environmental policy and planning and she is particularly interested in how cities and communities can collaboratively resolve environmental conflicts and adapt to climate change. Her work with EDR Program was supported by the MIT Public Service Center. You can read more about her summer fellowship work on her MIT Public Service Center blog.

Student Fellows for the 2014-2015 academic year

  • Meg Osswald (2016 JD candidate) earned environmental clinic credit in Fall 2014 and Spring 2015 by co-facilitating, taking meeting notes, and drafting meeting summaries for a grazing collaboration group in Green River, Utah.  She is also President of the Natural Resources Law Forum and plans to receive a Certificate in Environmental and Natural Resources Law.

Student Fellows for the 2013-2014 academic year

  • Haley Carmer (2014 JD) earned credits toward a Pro Bono Certificate in Fall 2013 by providing research, interview and report-drafting assistance for the Homeless Situation Assessment.  In April 2014, she facilitated a small group discussion at the Homeless Solutions Retreat and presented an Environmental Conflict Resolution class session on “Neuroscience and Conflict.”
  • Hunter Holman (2014 JD) facilitated a small group discussion at the Salt Lake Community Action Program’s community forum in March 2014.  He is a visiting student spending his third year at the S.J. Quinney College of Law, but will be receiving his JD from Suffolk Law.  Mr. Holman served as a content editor on the Journal of High Technology Law at Suffolk Law, and is focusing on environmental and energy law.  He is interested in pursuing a career in environmental dispute resolution.
  • Scott Hutchins (2014 JD) researched the history, process, and implementation of the Washington County Lands Bill (passed with the Omnibus Public Land Management Act of 2009, Pub.L. 111-11). The Washington County Lands Bill is often described as the preeminent example of successful collaborative environmental dispute resolution. The final product for this project was a case study, including a section devoted to lessons learned that will further the educational element of the EDR program. Mr. Hutchins focused on natural resources law and served as the Vice President of the Natural Resources Law Forum for the 2012 – 2013 academic year. He was awarded both a David C. Williams fellowship, as well as a Reza Khazeni Memorail Fellowship in Environmental Law for the 2013-2014 academic year.
  • Melissa Reynolds (2015 JD) earned environmental clinic credit in Fall 2013 by providing interview and analysis assistance for the Homeless Situation Assessment.  She is also Vice President of the Natural Resources Law Forum.  Melissa plans to receive a Certificate in Environmental and Natural Resources Law in order to improve her ability to practice in these fields of law following graduation.
  • Jason Steiert (2014 JD) earned environmental clinic credit in Fall 2013 by providing research, interview and report-drafting assistance for the Homeless Situation Assessment. Mr. Steiert is tailoring his coursework to obtain the Wallace Stegner Center Certificate in Environmental and Natural Resources Law upon graduation.
  • Shane Stroud (2014 JD) earned environmental clinic credit in Fall 2013 by providing interview and analysis assistance for the Homeless Situation Assessment. In April 2014, he facilitated a small group discussion at the Homeless Solutions Retreat. In addition to the environmental clinic, Mr. Stroud has focused his law school scholarship in areas of environmental and natural resources law specific to the West. He is also a contributor to the EDR Blog.

Student Fellows for the 2012-2013 academic year

  • Haley Carmer (2014 JD) earned environmental clinic credit in Fall 2012 by developing a simulation for use in a collaboration workshop for Forest Service rangers.  She researched and selected the legal context for the exercise, and developed the desired teaching points and role play fact pattern.  In Spring 2013, Ms. Carmer earned additional clinic credit by co-facilitating a committee retreat, as well as taking notes and drafting the full partnership meeting summary for the Escalante River Watershed Partnership.
  • Derrick Perkins (2013 JD) earned mediation clinic credit for his assistance at two Escalante River Partnership meetings. He acted as scribe and co-facilitator for a woody invasives committee retreat; he took notes and drafted the meeting summary for the full partnership meeting. Mr. Perkins is focusing on real estate law with an interest in connecting that to ADR practices.
  • Jason Steiert (2014 JD) helped design the Environmental Dispute Resolution in Utah Survey (see Current Projects, Report Card) to promote a balance between qualitative and quantitative responses, and conducted and wrote the quantitative survey analysis of the results.