PDO Tips for Spring Break

We know that you are looking forward to your break!  Whatever you do, include some fun activities for yourself so that you come back to school refreshed and ready to tackle the rest of the semester.   Spring Break is also a good time to reflect on your future career and do some planning.  The following are a few ideas from PDO if you plan to devote part of your break to career-related activities:

Don’t you have an “interests” section on your resume?  Do some of those.  If you need to get away from it all and recharge, that’s OK too!  Consider the interview question “What do you like to do in your spare time?” and do something worth talking about!

Visit PDO. Have your résumé/cover letter reviewed by PDO, or visit PDO to discuss job search strategies.  Our office is open during spring break. Keep in mind, however, that Thursday and Friday, the office will be a little quieter as  both Jaclyn and Anneliese will be gone.

Volunteer on a Pro Bono project.  If you haven’t done any work with a pro bono project yet or would like to do more, spring break is a great time to volunteer.  There are many projects with flexible hours, and it’s not too late to jump in.  Visit the “Current Opportunities” page on the Pro Bono Initiative website or talk to JoLynn Spruance (Room 112c in the hallway across from PDO) about potential placements.

Schedule some informational interviews.  If you are in the “career exploration” stage and would like to find out more about careers in a specific sector, schedule some informational interviews with practicing attorneys to find out more about careers in areas you may be interested in pursuing, whether it is litigation, family law, or government careers.  The purpose of informational interviews is not to get a job, but to find out more about potential career paths and expand your network.  PDO can help connect you with some practicing attorneys who would be willing to talk with you about their careers.  

 

Kick your job search up a notch.  If you attended the PDO workshop on “Finding Jobs in an Economic Downturn”, you heard the speakers discuss how important it is to make a regular time commitment to your job search.  It’s admittedly hard to look for a job, attend classes, and study.  Take advantage of your week off from school to put in a few hours researching potential employers and sending out applications.  Be organized!  Keep good records of when you sent your applications.  Follow up several weeks later with a phone call to see if the employers have had a chance to review your application materials, if they have any questions about your application, and if they would be available to meet and discuss potential opportunities with the organization (interview!).  At the least, this phone call will probably get your résumé moved to the top of the pile.

 

If you are traveling to a location out-of-state where you’d like to work, contact potential employers to let them know that you will be in town and ask if someone would be available to meet with you to discuss potential employment.  If you have “reciprocity” from a school in the area, contact the career services office to see if you could meet with them to discuss employment opportunities in the area.